Project summary

OSF-SA seeks a partner to conceptualise and roll out workshops in mine-affected communities to 1) popularise the Africa Mining Vision (AMV) and the African Minerals Governance Framework (AMGF), and 2) build capacity within identified communities on using the AMV and AMGF as advocacy tools to promote good governance and shared benefit across the value chain in the mining sector.

Background and context

In 2009 the African Union (AU) Heads of State and Government adopted the AMV as a vision for transforming the continent’s mining sector. This was based on the realisation that African countries, decades after the end of colonialism, continue to export most minerals in their raw form, which undermines the sector’s potential to fundamentally transform local economies and contribute to sustainable development. In response to this enduring reality, the AMV calls on all AU member states to transform mineral governance by ensuring that mining and related legislation address the loopholes that prevent Africa from benefiting from its rich mineral endowment. The AMV directs African countries to take collective action and coordinate efforts to improve mining sector governance and performance, and explicitly envisages a central role for the private sector and civil society in shifting the trajectory of mining towards shared benefit.

The AMV proposes seven pillars to transform Africa’s natural capital into vibrant, diversified, and developed economies through, among other opportunities, resource rents, physical infrastructure, beneficiation, local procurement, and technology. These pillars relate to geological knowledge, promoting artisanal and small-scale mining, environmental and social responsibility, building institutional and human capacities, economic diversification, promoting good governance across the mining value chain and equitable distribution of benefits. One of the most transformative proposals in the AMV relates to the creation of economic linkages in the mineral value chain, where mining catalyses other industries to diversify the economy and create jobs. For example, in terms of backward linkages, mining requires various inputs such as machinery and equipment, fabricated metal products and chemicals. When considering forward linkages, mining provides inputs for motor vehicles, chemicals, and electricity among other sectors. The result is a diversified and developed economy that has reduced reliance on mining as a single industry. This represents a paradigm shift from the status quo in most African countries, where mining occurs in enclaves with very little spill-over into other economic sectors.

The AMV has two supporting guidance documents to assist countries with implementation Vision. The African Mineral Governance Framework (AMGF) is an institutional implementation instrument for use at the national, regional, and continental level to operationalise the AMV. The Country Mining Vision (CMV) guidebook helps AU member states to domesticate the AMV at the national level through a multi-stakeholder process. Despite the existence of these guidance frameworks, and claims by countries that they are committed to implementing the AMV, take up at the national level, has been slow, including in South Africa, where the government scarcely even references the AMV.

Civil society has a critical role to play in implementing and monitoring the AMV, particularly at the national level. This follows from civil society participation in the development of the AMV, and the role performed by civil society organisations (CSOs) in developing the AMGF. To this end, CSOs including community-based organisations (CBOs) in AU member states can use the AMV and AMGF as advocacy tools to call for reforms in the mining industry that will ensure broad-based benefit and sustainable development using the mining industry as a catalyst. As an AU member state, South Africa should seek to align mining policies, laws, and guidelines to the AMV, instead of introducing reforms in policy and practice that go against the spirit of the Vision. However, despite the South African government’s commitment to implementing the AMV, mine-affected communities and other CSOs have not adequately leveraged the AMV as a lens or tool for articulating their demands for reform. This gap has enabled the government to ignore its commitment to implementing the AMV. Given persistent problems in mine-affected communities resulting directly from mining activities, and questions around how citizens benefit from mining, civil society should use every available tool to advocate for reforms that will ensure equitable benefit sharing and responsible mining that does not threaten the livelihoods of communities and the environment. This project will build capacity among mine-affected communities and other CSOs to use the AMV and the AMGF in their advocacy and engagements with the government, as the primary duty bearer for social and economic development.

The project

Objectives

OSF-SA seeks a partner to conceptualise and roll out workshops in mine-affected communities to 1) popularise the Africa Mining Vision (AMV) and the African Minerals Governance Framework (AMGF), and 2) build capacity within identified communities on using the AMV and AMGF as advocacy tools to promote good governance and shared benefit across the value chain in the mining sector.

Proposed activities

  1. Conduct scoping research, and draft a report on the extent of exposure of mine-affected communities to the AMV.
  2. Develop an agenda for the national and provincial workshops as per the objectives.
  3. Host one national workshop on the AMV targeting CSOs working on mineral governance from across the country. This workshop will seek to popularise the AMV and solicit input from participants on developing an advocacy strategy based on the AMV.
  4. Host at least 4 provincial workshops in 4 provinces on the AMV targeting mine-affected communities, specifically women and youth. These workshops will seek to popularise the AMV and solicit input from participants on developing an advocacy strategy based on the AMV.
  5. Based on the workshop outcomes, develop an advocacy plan for how mine-affected communities and NGOs can use the AMV to advocate for good governance.
  6. Draft a report based on the scoping study and workshop outcomes including an assessment of the value of using the AMV in mineral governance advocacy.

Project period

Maximum 12 months

Proposal due date

11 September 2017

NB: The proposal needs to be in the OSF-SA application template, which can be sent to you.

If you would like to submit a proposal, contact The Research and Advocacy Unit at Specialprojects@osfsa.org.za